Our Personal Fun Zones

December 18th, 2008

Focus Text: Proverbs 10: 23 (NLT)

23 Doing wrong is fun for a fool,
      but living wisely brings pleasure to the sensible.

 

Stop Here and Reflect Before Reading Ahead

Fun.  A word that has taken our society by storm over the past sixty or seventy years.  Fun has become the name of life’s game; the focus of our efforts.  But what does “fun” really mean?  Can we really define it?  “Enjoyment,” I suppose, is one possible definition; but it doesn’t fully do it for me.  Fun is an entity unto itself; it has no strings attached to it.  In other words, we can do something simply for “the fun of it” and that’s an acceptable reason.  Things that are fun don’t have to accomplish anything.  They don’t have to be productive.  Fun is literally an intense enjoyment of the present moment that may or may not have an effect on future moments.

Man, aren’t you glad that fun exists?  Just last night, I attended a comedy night with Comedian Jonnie Wethington and I had a blast.  Now, this even was actually raising funds for a good cause, but fun requires no cause to be had.  Different people have differing definitions of fun.  Some out there think watching Vanderbilt play football is fun (sorry, I couldn’t resist.)  Others think that line dancing is fun or skydiving.  Fun, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder.  What we consider to be fun is usually a reflection of our value systems or our personal interests.  

That’s why this passage makes a direct statement about two diverse types of individual who have two diverse opinions about what is fun.  “Doing wrong is fun for a fool, but living wisely brings pleasure to the sensible.”  Hey, we’d be completely clueless to ignore the fact that doing wrong can be fun.  If it weren’t, we wouldn’t do it. However, as this passage states, this kind of fun is foolish.  How would we describe foolish fun?  It would be the skydiver who leaves his parachute on the plane.  What a rush that would be . . . temporarily.  You’d go from “rush” to “splat” at a rate of 9.8 meters per second squared (a little physics for you.)  In this case, the fun would not be worth the foolishness . . . it never is.

But fun doesn’t have to be wrong . . . whew!  I’m always amused at the opinions those outside of our circles have of us and our lifestyles.  They sometimes think that we live completely uneventful lives with little to no social interaction.  We wake up at 5:30 am to pray for two hours, put together an unfashionable ensemble of clothes for ourselves, eat a bland bowl of tasteless bran cereal, get into our 1988 Geo Metros, and sit at desks all day trying real hard not to sin or to tear our pocket-protectors.

Yeah right!  Just because a life is spent seeking the right things doesn’t mean that it is boring or unenjoyable.  In fact, scripture would confirm the opposite.  ” . . . living wisely brings pleasure to the sensible.”  

The greatest realization of the concept of fun that I ever had happened sometime between my junior of high school and my sophomore year of college.  Somewhere in the midst of those formative seasons of life, I become self-aware of fun.  When you’re young, the culture of your peers attempts to define what’s fun for everybody.  So it doesn’t really matter if you like going to concerts or not; if the powers-that-be say it’s fun, then you’re going to give it a shot.  Throw in those “wrong” things that we’ve been talking about, and you can see why that under the right pressure and the wrong circumstances, students and adults alike can make huge skydiving-sized mistakes because someone else convinced them it was fun.

But one day, I abandoned everybody else’s definition of fun and embraced my own.  Look, writing is fun for me. I think running is fun.  I enjoy history and basketball.  If that makes me a dork, then what of it . . . fun is my choice, not everybody else’s.  How would our world change if people . . . especially Christians . . . took personal ownership of this “fun” concept and didn’t define it by everyone else’s whims.  Now, that would be fun.  

Furthermore, what if doing that which pleases God were to became a fun idea instead of just a obligatory one?  Just a thought.  Living wisely is fun and we can avoid that unfortunate splat as well.

 

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~ by johndriver on December 18, 2008.

2 Responses to “Our Personal Fun Zones”

  1. Fun is one of God’s greatest gifts to us for sure. I’m looking forward to having fun with God forever. It’s gonna be sweeeeeeet!

    I think you’d appreciate this video:

    Blessings to you!

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